Police Arrest 15 Underage Drinkers at Memorial Day Party - The Atlanta DUI News Blog

The Atlanta DUI News Blog

Police Arrest 15 Underage Drinkers at Memorial Day Party

On Monday, Suwanee police made 15 alcohol-related arrests at a Memorial Day party, WSBTV.com reports.

An annoyed neighbor called the police complaining about loud music coming from the home. When Suwanee police responded, they found 20 people in the backyard, many of whom were underage and drinking.

Police responded to the neighbor's call at around 1 a.m. on Monday. The backyard of the house was littered in beer cans and plastic cups, according to police.

Police asked the attendees who was old enough to drink, but most responded that they weren't. However, all party-goers were at least 17-years-old, according to the police report.

"Some folks ran into the house," Suwanee police spokesman Capt. Cass Mooney said. "We didn't chase anybody or anything."

Police required the teens to submit to Breathalyzer tests. Those whose results showed no sign of alcohol were allowed to leave. The thirteen teens whose results showed signs of drinking, were cited for underage drinking.

Had the teens not been cited, many of them may have driven home while drunk. Under Georgia's motor vehicle code, it's illegal for any person under the age of 21 to operate a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of .02 or higher. Underage DUI is a misdemeanor and is punishable by 10 days to 12 months in prison, a maximum fine of $1,000, and the revocation of driving privileges for at least 6 months.

One of the cited teens stated that his parents owned the home and were upstairs sleeping. According to him, the alcohol was left over from one of his parents' parties.

The homeowners, Ivan Romero-Pereira and Nohora Ternera-Gonzalez, have been charged with contributing to the delinquency of minors for providing alcohol and allowing the Memorial Day party to happen. A conviction for contributing to the delinquency of a minor is punishable by a maximum fine of $1,000 and imprisonment for up to 12 months.

Related Resources: