Atlanta Understanding DUI / Research: The Atlanta DUI News Blog

The Atlanta DUI News Blog

Understanding DUI / Research in Atlanta

How many shots of liquor does it take before you exceed the legal limit of .08 blood alcohol content in Georgia? Do you have a right to decline a random sobriety test on the roads outside Buckhead? What is the difference between a Field Sobriety Test and a Breathalyzer test? And can you turn any of them down?

If Jay-Z can dish advice about your rights while rapping, FindLaw can definitely try and answer some of the real DUI questions that Georgians face. Not only does knowing your rights and responsibilities help you look good in front of your friends, but it might save the lives of those very friends. You should confirm our advice with a local Atlanta DUI lawyer.


Recently in Understanding DUI / Research Category

5 Terrible DUI Excuses Never to Use on a Cop

When trying to get out of a DUI, some excuses work better than others.

Telling the police officer that you were "trying to drive it off"? Not a good DUI excuse.

Here are five other DUI excuses you should never use on a cop:

3 Questions About Alternative Sentences for your DUI Attorney

After taking a look at Georgia's DUI laws, you may have wondered about alternative sentences.

The availability of alternative sentences will hinge on the specific facts of a DUI case, so your best bet is to consult a DUI attorney for an evaluation of your particular case.

Here are three questions about alternative sentences to ask your DUI attorney:

5 Tips for Avoiding a Holiday DUI

Beware holiday DUIs this season. While you may not see the harm in a one or two drinks that don't seem to affect your motor skills at all, the law sees otherwise. This holiday season, many drivers are being cautious about DUI checkpoints that will have you behind bars even if you blow barely .08, Augusta's WRDW-TV reports.

There will be many an occasion to celebrate the season now that Thanksgiving is officially in the rear-view mirror. But, before you do, here are five tips for avoiding a holiday DUI:

3 Ways To Contest a DUI

How can you contest a DUI? After the new head coach of the Atlanta Hawks was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence, according to The Associated Press, this question is likely on his mind.

Mike Budenholzer's case has yet to be settled, but the new coach stated earlier this week that he wants to focus on preparing his team. He added that "it's important for [him] to respect" the legal process, though he does plan to contest the charge.

A DUI can affect anyone -- so here are 3 ways to contest one:

Driving Drunk With Kids: Charges Are Not Childs Play

Drunk driving is bad enough, but drunk driving with kids? An offender's charges and penalties could be taken to a whole new level. This is what Ashok Kapoor, 47, is now waiting to hear back on, after being pulled over for driving drunk with three of his children in the backseat, Atlanta's WSB-TV reports.

It should go without saying that you should never drink and drive. But, if you're caught doing so with your kids in the car, a DUI may not be the only issue you'll have to deal with. Here's a general overview of driving drunk with kids in Georgia:

What Not to Say After DUI Arrest

What shouldn't you say after a DUI arrest? A YouTube video confession from an offender who committed a fatal DUI has gone viral, and despite 22-year-old Matthew Cordle's heartfelt pact to take full responsibility for his actions, the consequences and the unfortunate death of his victim had already occurred.

If you've been pulled over for a DUI, certain things may already be out of your hands. For Cordle, it was the fact that someone was killed due to his actions.

This is a good reminder to make sure you make the right choices following a DUI incident, including what you say. Here are some important things not to say after a DUI arrest:

3 Things to Know About Ignition Interlock in Georgia

How much do you know about ignition interlock law in Georgia? DUI laws vary by state, meaning so do their penalties. Ignition interlock, while it is a rather pesky device, allows a DUI offender to still drive, even if they could be given a suspended license.

The device itself has to be installed by the driver in his or her car. Once it's installed, the driver must then blow into the device every time they get into their car. If the system registers the driver's breath with no trace of alcohol detected, then the engine will start. If there is any alcohol detected over approximately 0.00%, the engine won't start.

In addition to those basics, here are three things you should know about ignition interlock laws in Georgia:

A Guide to Georgia's Open Container Law

You've heard of open container laws. Many states have them, including Georgia.

It's illegal to drive while under the influence. It's also illegal to have an open container of alcohol near you when you are driving.

So what is Georgia's open container law and how does it work?

5 Apps to Stop Distracted Driving

According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driving while not distracted. Combine distracted driving with drunken driving, and you get a disaster waiting to happen.

There have been many initiatives to try to curb distracted driving. But the use of handheld devices and smartphones makes it difficult for drivers to keep their attention focused on the road.

This is especially the case with younger drivers, who are infamous for texting while driving. The idea that many people have is that they can multitask and do both.

But all it takes is one second for the unthinkable to happen. Here are some apps that can help deal with texting while driving:

The drunk tank is already scary enough. Imagine landing in it while wearing the Christmas sweater your grandma knitted for you. You're sure to be a big hit with your cellmates.

Georgia law enforcement will be on the lookout for drunken drivers this holiday season. So if you plan on drinking at holiday parties, you should also have a plan to get home safely.